RESEARCH

* Eligibility: Doctoral Students of Color

This online survey contains questions about your Ph.D. program, the factors that impact your career decision-making, potential race and gender barriers, your work-life balance, and your physical and mental health. This survey will help us to assess the importance of these factors in Ph.D. and post-Ph.D. career trajectories and should take about 25 minutes to complete. The first 700 eligible participants to complete the survey will receive a $20 Amazon gift card. All participants who complete the survey may enter a raffle for a chance to win an Apple Watch® (1 out of 4 available).

At the end of the survey, there will also be an opportunity for STEM major doctoral students to sign up for a 9-month mentoring program, called Professoriate Bound (see below for more details). The mentoring program is designed to minimize the stress and strain associated with racialized and race-gendered experiences participants may be experiencing within their STEM doctoral programs

Professoriate Bound

In order to increase the proportion of Black engineering faculty in academic positions in the U.S., EDEFI will implement and assess a program called, “Professoriate Bound: Online Coaching for Black Engineering Scholars.”
N

It is a race- and gender-conscious, online coaching program for Black Ph.D. students and postdoctoral scholars from engineering who are interested in academic careers.

N

A tenured engineering professor paired with a tenured social science professor will lead teams of five participants.

N

The teams will meet twice a month for eight months.

N

It is sponsored by the NSF Broadening Participation in Engineering program (https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1642895)

N

The curriculum will address professional development topics as well as issues related to race and gender.

N

The program starts in the first quarter of 2018 with four teams.

Professoriate Bound Videos

Creating a Thriving Research Enterprise: Developing a Research Agenda

Dr. Frances Williams

Critical Race Theory in Law and Beyond

Dr. Beverly Moran

Financial Planning for Your Future

Corey Carney

Identifying and Addressing Unconscious Race and Gender Bias

Dr. Sandra Barnes

A Brief History of Race in America

Dr. Dennis Dickerson

Understanding and Disarming Microaggressions for STEM Students of Color

Dr. Donna Ford

Race, Identity and Culture: Barriers to Diversifying the STEM Professoriate

Dr. Richard Pitt

The History of the Black Experience at Predominately White Institutions

Dr. Rosevelt Noble

Resources

Below are a list of resources and cited sources frequently used in our work

Resources

Below are a list of resources and cited sources frequently used in our work

i
Alexander, Q. R., & Hermann, M. A. (2016). African-American women’s experiences in graduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education at a predominantly white university: A qualitative investigation. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 9(4), 307-322.
i
Beasley, M. A., & Fischer, M. J. (2012). Why they leave: The impact of stereotype threat on the attrition of women and minorities from science, math and engineering majors. Social Psychology of Education, 15, 427-448.
i
Eagan Jr, M. K., & Garvey, J. C. (2015). Stressing out: Connecting race, gender, and stress with faculty productivity. The Journal of Higher Education, 86(6), 923-954.
i
Espinosa, L. (2011). Pipelines and pathways: Women of color in undergraduate STEM majors and the college experiences that contribute to persistence.Harvard Educational Review,  81(2), 209-241.
i
Gumpertz, M., Durodoye, R., Griffith, E., and Wilson, A. “Retention and promotion of women and underrepresented minority faculty in science and engineering at four large land grant institutions,” PLOS ONE, vol. 12, p. e0187285, 2017.
i
Malone, K. R., & Barabino, G. (2009). Narrations of race in STEM research settings: Identity formation and its discontents. Science Education, 93(3), 485-510.
i
Martin, D. B. (2009). Researching Race in Mathematics Education. Teachers College Record, 111(2), 295–338.
i
May, G. S., & Chubin, D. E. (2003). A retrospective on undergraduate engineering success for underrepresented minority students. Journal of Engineering Education, 92(1), 27–39.
i
McCoy, D. L., Winkle-Wagner, R., & Luedke, C. L. (2015). Colorblind mentoring? Exploring white faculty mentoring of students of color. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 8(4), 225-242.
i
McGowan, J. M. (2000). Multicultural teaching: African American faculty classroom teaching experiences in predominantly White colleges and universities. Multicultural Education, 8(2), 19-22.
i
Ong, M., Wright, C., Espinosa, L., & Orfield, G. (2011). Inside the double bind: A synthesis of empirical research on undergraduate and graduate women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Harvard Educational Review, 81(2), 172-209.

i
Slaughter, J. B. & Tao, Y. & Pearson, J. W.(2015). Changing the Face of Engineering: The African American Experience. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

i
Thompson, J. J., & Windschitl, M. (2005). ” FAILING GIRLS”: Understanding Connections among Identity Negotiation, Personal Relevance, and Engagement in Science Learning from Underachieving Girls. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 11(1), 1-26.
i
Turner, C.S.V., González, J.C. and Wood, J.L. “Faculty of color in academe: What 20 years of literature tells us,” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, vol. 1, pp. 139-168, 2008.

i

Upton, R., & Tanenbaum, C. (2014). The role of historically black colleges and universities as pathway providers: Institutional pathways to the STEM PhD. American Institutes for Research. Retrieved from: Click to view source

i
Winkle-Wagner, R., & McCoy, D. L. (2016). Feeling like an “alien” or “family”? Comparing students and faculty experiences of diversity in STEM disciplines at a PWI and an HBCU. Race Ethnicity and Education, 1–14.
i

Yoder, B.L. Engineering by the numbers. American Society for Engineering Education, Available: Click to view source

i
Zambrana, R. E., Ray, R., Espino, M. M., Castro, C., Cohen, B. D., & Eliason, J. (2015). “Don’t Leave Us Behind” The Importance of Mentoring for Underrepresented Minority Faculty. American Educational Research Journal, 52(1), 40-72.
i
Alexander, Q. R., & Hermann, M. A. (2016). African-American women’s experiences in graduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education at a predominantly white university: A qualitative investigation. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 9(4), 307-322.
i
Beasley, M. A., & Fischer, M. J. (2012). Why they leave: The impact of stereotype threat on the attrition of women and minorities from science, math and engineering majors. Social Psychology of Education, 15, 427-448.
i
Eagan Jr, M. K., & Garvey, J. C. (2015). Stressing out: Connecting race, gender, and stress with faculty productivity. The Journal of Higher Education, 86(6), 923-954.
i
Espinosa, L. (2011). Pipelines and pathways: Women of color in undergraduate STEM majors and the college experiences that contribute to persistence.Harvard Educational Review,  81(2), 209-241.
i
Gumpertz, M., Durodoye, R., Griffith, E., and Wilson, A. “Retention and promotion of women and underrepresented minority faculty in science and engineering at four large land grant institutions,” PLOS ONE, vol. 12, p. e0187285, 2017.
i
Malone, K. R., & Barabino, G. (2009). Narrations of race in STEM research settings: Identity formation and its discontents. Science Education, 93(3), 485-510.
i
Martin, D. B. (2009). Researching Race in Mathematics Education. Teachers College Record, 111(2), 295–338.
i
May, G. S., & Chubin, D. E. (2003). A retrospective on undergraduate engineering success for underrepresented minority students. Journal of Engineering Education, 92(1), 27–39.
i
McCoy, D. L., Winkle-Wagner, R., & Luedke, C. L. (2015). Colorblind mentoring? Exploring white faculty mentoring of students of color. Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, 8(4), 225-242.
i
McGowan, J. M. (2000). Multicultural teaching: African American faculty classroom teaching experiences in predominantly White colleges and universities. Multicultural Education, 8(2), 19-22.
i
Ong, M., Wright, C., Espinosa, L., & Orfield, G. (2011). Inside the double bind: A synthesis of empirical research on undergraduate and graduate women of color in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Harvard Educational Review, 81(2), 172-209.

i
Slaughter, J. B. & Tao, Y. & Pearson, J. W.(2015). Changing the Face of Engineering: The African American Experience. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press.

i
Thompson, J. J., & Windschitl, M. (2005). ” FAILING GIRLS”: Understanding Connections among Identity Negotiation, Personal Relevance, and Engagement in Science Learning from Underachieving Girls. Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering, 11(1), 1-26.
i
Turner, C.S.V., González, J.C. and Wood, J.L. “Faculty of color in academe: What 20 years of literature tells us,” Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, vol. 1, pp. 139-168, 2008.

i

Upton, R., & Tanenbaum, C. (2014). The role of historically black colleges and universities as pathway providers: Institutional pathways to the STEM PhD. American Institutes for Research. Retrieved from: Click to view source

i
Winkle-Wagner, R., & McCoy, D. L. (2016). Feeling like an “alien” or “family”? Comparing students and faculty experiences of diversity in STEM disciplines at a PWI and an HBCU. Race Ethnicity and Education, 1–14.
i

Yoder, B.L. Engineering by the numbers. American Society for Engineering Education, Available: Click to view source

i
Zambrana, R. E., Ray, R., Espino, M. M., Castro, C., Cohen, B. D., & Eliason, J. (2015). “Don’t Leave Us Behind” The Importance of Mentoring for Underrepresented Minority Faculty. American Educational Research Journal, 52(1), 40-72.

disclaimer:

This work was supported by grant funding from the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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